The creator of Kwanzaa, Dr. Maulana Karenga explains the seven principles of Kwanzaa and the reasons for the holiday. 

 

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Davis is in Yolo County, which had a 2017 area median income of $76,900 for a four-person household. Using the 30% of-income affordability standard, a median-income family of four living in an average market-rate apartment in Davis is paying $5,592 per year more than they can afford.

“I couldn’t be happier living and baking in this city. The business is stable. I‘m more stable.”

Things weren’t quite so clear for Ryan when he moved here from Minneapolis in 1999.

“I moved for a relationship and had three of the worst jobs I had in my life. I almost moved back,” he said.

He recalled bounced paychecks and other indignities served up to him in the local food trade.

NCBA CLUSA is deeply saddened to confirm that 18 of its project staff members, and three others, totaling 21 people, have died as a result of yesterday’s bus accident in Uganda.

What does it take for cooperatives to take hold in the economy? Principle six of the seven international cooperative principles is “cooperation among cooperatives,” but this can be easier said than done. In this show, we hear from Howard Brodsky, co-CEO and founder of CCA Global Partners, a large purchasing cooperative, and founder of Cooperatives for a Better World.

“I am an owner and a worker,” said Daisy Salvador, an immigrant from Honduras and one of the founding members of the Healthy Planet Cleaning Cooperative, in Spanish. “As an owner of a cooperative, I am excited to have the opportunity to build a better life for myself and my family.”

There is time to organize resistance. Perhaps that resistance can take the form of a militant demand that these facilities should be condemned by government authority and turned over to the workers whose labor created the wealth and profits that General Motors’ shareholders enjoy. They could then, with government assistance, be retooled and placed under the ownership and control of their workers, organized into democratic cooperatives for that purpose.

Lei Company Co-op founder Tiffany Rose Naputi Lacsado chats with Matt Cropp about the origins of their worker co-op and the current capital campaign aimed at funding their growth into the school graduation Lei market in California.

2018 has been a year of growth and growing pains for Cooperation Jackson. We’ve experienced some significant advances and some setbacks. Over the last four years of our organization, we have learned a lot that we aim to build upon to improve our practice and advance our work in 2019 and beyond.

I am sending a link to a TED talk. Unusal for me. This one is really unusual. If you watch the first two minutes or so, you will probably have to watch the whole thing.

It's about the core of democracy and our cooperative/solidarity movements far more than any scaling up efforts could possibly be. Everything we do needs to burn gently and fiercely with this, and that includes changing ourselves.

 

The best system does not help if we can’t do it in our groups. How can we keep our teams on track?

I assume that we’re talking about a scenario where the group has been trained on process. As colleague Jerry Koch-Gonzalez says: sociocracy depends more on good followers than on good facilitators. Culture training does not change overnight, and none of us have grown up in non-coercive systems. It takes practice and more practice to replace our internalized coercive patterns by non-coercive, truly collaborative ones.

Matthias Scheiblehner on why his Seattle construction firm Metis converted into a worker co-op.

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Last month I conducted a series of workshops at a brace cooperative houses in Austin TX. While there I got into an interesting conversation with folks about the pros and cons of open membership (where anyone can join if their rent check clears). I want to share the highlights of that exchange.

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