To understand the particular pull of Co-op City, talk to Alex Cruz. Cruz grew up here, on the 24th floor of a chevron-shaped high rise with narrow corridors but wide windows. It’s where his father still lives.

Like many college students with the approach of summer, CoFED is also preparing to graduate! Through Strategic Planning, we are making the important transition to an organization that provides longer term job security to its workers, and more consistent support to the student teams that make up the CoFED network.

Greenwashing has been around for some years now. Corporations were not slow to realize that re-branding their products as “green” was a quicker, and much cheaper way to hold on to consumer loyalties than going the arduous, more expensive route of actually making their products better for the environment.

Since the global financial system unraveled in 2008, U.S. policymakers have struggled heroically to improve the performance and oversight of global banks and investment firms.

The New York City Network of Worker Cooperatives will hold its first annual conference of presentations and discussions about economic democracy and the road to economic justice.

Online platforms are making it possible again for people to share resources such as cars, homes and time. As well as bringing people together, they’re a way to save money in a tepid economy.

 

What is the role that cooperative economics has played in African American history and the civil rights movement? Last month, GRITtv guest Jessica Gordon Nembhard and Black Women's Blueprint Executive Director Farah Tanis had a conversation about how cooperative economics plays a role in both the past and present in African-American history.

See more from GRITtv

Today’s global social economy debate on inhibiting inequalities (wealth aggregation, social mobility, and basic opportunities) illustrates the vital roles that structure and values play to foster community-focused, triple bottomline, socially-oriented businesses that can’t be outsourced. Similar to the progressive advocacy media depiction of Jackson Rising: Creating the Mondragon of the South there is so much Appalachian hilltop and valley academic centers can do to organize and network inspiring rust belt graduates into a better future that allows them not only to be home-schooled but also locally and gainfully employed.

On the face of it, Loconomics and Bring It Local sound like typical tech startups.

But behind the scenes, both companies are fomenting a quiet revolution in their business structures. They are organizing themselves as cooperatives - for-profit enterprises owned by the people who work for and use the services.

Read the full article at SFGate

‘Building Resilience in the Malawian Co‑operative Movement’, by Sara Vicari and Alexander Borda-Rodriguez, is the outcome of a one-year, Leverhulme-funded collaborative research project between the Co-operative College and The Open University.

In the Bronx borough of New York City stands a proud pioneering housing co-operative affectionately known as The Amalgamated.

Could Jackson, Mississippi become the capital of cooperative economics in the south?  Mayor Chokwe Lumumba imagined it this way, championing a vision of solidarity economics to heal the city's economic wounds and move forward into a new, more inclusive economy.

Watch more at GRITtv

A vision of a community-led “solidarity economy” is capturing the attention of a new generation of progressive New Yorkers.  Seeking to address the ecological, economic, and political crises of our time, local groups are reinvigorating cooperative economic models and inventing new ones, putting into action a vision for an economic system that is based on values of social and racial justice, ecological sustainability, c

On Sunday, Germany’s impressive streak of renewable energy milestones continued, with renewable energy generation surging to a record portion — nearly 75 percent — of the country’s overall electricity demand by midday.

The Marriage of Abuse and Vulnerability.

The title comes from William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell. I don’t know if his theme relates to the theme of “two under-cultures” or not. The title does relate, however, at least superficially.

Chang believes co-operatives need to demonstrate their relevance. He points out that people are unaware of the number of co-operatives, while high profile co-operatives “have done things that you wouldn’t normally associate with being a co-op” and businesses like Waitrose “don’t shout about being a co-op”. Quite simply, “co-ops haven’t kept up”.

We the Owners is an award-winning documentary film of three US companies that share ownership and responsibility with their employees to achieve common goals of having meaning and purpose at work, creating participative and empowering work places, and defining success beyond shareholder value.

Watch the full documentary at PBS

These last few weeks many in national media have been mesmerized by the saga of Donald Sterling and his confessions of personal and systemic racism. Black communities have engaged in a lively discussion of “what they should do,” “what I would do” and “what I have done” when confronting institutional racism in the workplace.

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