Gleanings

“The central solutions to address the climate crisis are not actually going to come from looking up and counting carbon in the atmosphere,” Mascarenhas-Swan said. “They are going to come from remaking the economy, which is the root of this struggle.”

KMO attended the People’s Climate March on Sunday and Flood Wall Street the next day. The first event was a permitted march that respected authority and was timed not to disrupt business.

A new economy must do more than distribute goods and services. It must also more equitably distribute meaningful opportunities for participation and wellbeing to the communities - human and ecological - so long exploited by our dominant political economy. A clue to how this can be achieved may lie in the very word “economy” itself.

[Editor's note: The Every Thing Goes furniture store is one of three businesses owned and run by Ganas, a cooperative community in Staten Island, NY.]

We meet to help one another explore, form, join, or improve businesses without bosses: worker cooperatives.

Join us if you are interested in working for yourself but not working alone— nor in being someone else's boss.

To create vibrant communities, people need to share in the decisions that affect them. This is true for neighborhoods, cities, and beyond.

The top 300 co-operatives in the world are collectively worth $2.205 trillion– an increase from the previous year’s result of $2.097 trillion.

My cousin, Charles Goodridge, was one of many unarmed black men killed by police this past summer. Black communities across the country have mobilized in response to this spate of high profile police killings.

Climate change, shifting demographics, and sobering economic realities for a growing number of Americans have sparked increased awareness of the need to re-examine how working class people and communities of color will successfully participate in tomorrow’s economy, the one they will inherit when our nation becomes an ethnic plurality.

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